December 7, 2021

Reading through Capcom's "The future of e-sports viewed through Street Fighter League"

Published November 15th, "CAPCOM e-Sports: The future of e-sports viewed through Street Fighter League". I picked the book up a while ago and am slowly reading through it. It has lots of interesting information that really explains what Capcom's view of e-sports is, and what they want to do with it.

I'll drop a few notes here and there as I slowly read through each chapter.

1 Chapter 1: Capcom's Path

1.1 Organizing to create the Best games in the World

This chapter is basically a history of Capcom, starting with the well known contraction of the name from "Capsule Computer". They talk about how they want to create top class games, and while Nintendo released the Famicon at about the same time that Capcom was founded, they thought that arcade hardware had more possibilities to offer the kinds of visuals and sound that the founder, Kenzo Tsujimoto, wanted to be able to create. He wanted to make graphics and sounds that could move people emotionally at the same level as Disney animation.

Capcom was founded in 1983, I didn't realize that they opened Capcom USA in 1985, that's super early. They also started with famicon conversions super early for their arcade games, a year or so after their founding. Founded a London office in 1989. They talk about how Final Fight was a big hit, they got a lot of fans from that, then put out SF2 to unseat Final Fight, and creating a new head to head genre. They talk about the SF movie, anime, etc., and how SF was a multi-use IP for them.

1.2 Creating a new Genre with Biohazard (Resident Evil)

Then they go into Biohazard / Resident Evil and how that created a new survival horror Genre. Interestingly they said it wasn't really all that well received at the time, but did well with word of mouth and became a real long-seller.

They also talk about "Stylish games" like Devil May Cry / Onimusha, and Ace Attorney. They founded offices in more countries, and talk about supporting series in mixed media environments, and the success of the Resident Evil movies. They get things right again with the release of Monster Hunter. They talk about more franchises (Dead Rising, Lost Planet, etc.) and I had forgotten how much good stuff Capcom has put out there (I didn't touch on the Rockman / MegaMan and other stuff from earlier) but Capcom has really continued to innovate and try new things, and push for mixed media IPs.

1.3 Starting Digital Sales early

The 2010 Keyword at Capcom was "Global Digitization". New consoles have internet, and there are multiple digital storefronts, so they want to take advantage of that. They list a lot of examples of different titles that sold well on different storefronts - I didn't know that the 3DS Super Street Fighter IV 3D Edition sold over a million copies. They are intentional about looking at their back catalog, and developing new (or porting old) titles to new systems and getting those out into digital markets to increase sales.

1.4 SF2 Cultivated the PvP Fighting Game Genre

(I could write "competitive" instead of PvP but the idea is person versus person and not necessarily high level competent organized play that the meaning of "competeitive" includes.)

This section was a brief overview of the SF2 series of games, then move to Alpha (with a new Anime style), SF3 with all new protagonist Alex, the revival in SF4, and release of SFV. SFV was viewed as a "reset" that would not only appeal to the core fighting game demographic, but would expand the user base bringing in new people with interesting collaborations, and providing something that perhaps older people could play with their kids (that is actually, my exact demographic.) Nothing super exciting here, more of a focus on sales numbers and very broad strokes of each game.

If you are intersted in the history of these games, you really should read Polygon's Street Fighter: An oral history, Polygon's Street Fighter II: An oral history, Polygon's Street Fighter The Movie: An oral history, Polygon's Street Fighter Alpha: An oral history, Polygon's Street Fighter 3: An oral history. Also, Capcom vs. SNK and X-Men: Children of the Atom: An oral history.

Check out how the James Chen icon changes over the articles. Cool.

1.5 The strategy of spotting trends as fast as possible

They say that e-sports are similar to physical sports in the way that you are able to practice to improve your ability and how you play will depend on how your opponent plays and your adjustment to them. It isn't easy to keep a game popular and successful over 30 years. The talk a little about how Capcom tried to bring in new players to the series with SFV and appeal to kids of people who grew up enjoying SF2. They collaborated with other companies titles to spread awareness of the series (people scoff at Fortnite, but I'm sure that has brought in some new players.)

The talk about trying to build a community online (did Dojos do that?) and using multiple outlets to spread the IP: movies, manga, goods, anime, etc. The popularity of the characters is such that people who don't play games know about Hadoken, etc. Now they want to focus on making e-sports in Japan and North America shine.

2 Our first attempts at e-sports

2.1 The Power of the Community

SF2 was really popular. When the SNES version came out, there were long lines before shops opened, it was a real cultural phenomenau. It was so popular, Capcom decided to run a Japanese National Tournament in Ryogoku-kan, a prestigious venue usually used for Sumo wrestling. They did that in 1992, hosting about 4000 people - but to get down to that number they needed to run tournaments all over Japan, which isn't easy.

They reached out to arcade and toy shops all across Japan - not just ones that had experience running tournaments but ones that hadn't done anything like that at all - Capcom wrote up a manual for running tournaments, the software you would need, bracket sheets (you complain about Smash.gg but it does do brackets), everything you would need to run a tournament even if you didn't know anything about them.

It was a success, and got a lot of media coverage. Capcom ran a national tournament for three years, with attendance at 7000 people in 1993, and 8000 in 1994. The hall was full with specatators as well. The authors note that Capcom has continued with tournament kits even to this day, in 2008 they ran a national SF4 tournament ("Let your fists burn!") in arcades, and they added a feature to let people who don't know anything about tournaments run an online tournament in SFV (I still need to try that out actually.)

They then talk about how at the time, the way to show you were good at a game was to get the high score, but SF2 changed all of that. The focus was on 1 on 1 battle against people, and not a score, but winning. Strong people started to gather at the arcades. The home version of the game extended that to brothers and sisters and friends, expanding the competitive landscape. SF2 really solidified the 1 on 1 fighting game genre.

They say that in the 1990s that is when the people that would become pro gamers really started to surface, and looking overseas there were large scale competitions there too. In the 2000s you could start to say that esports was born as tournaments that think about the business aspects of things were on the rise and serious competitors really started to see a big increase.

They talk about EVO and how it was founded in a serious way in 2002, and really became the exemplar of tournaments that everyone wanted to win. It was community run. (Praise be to the Cannons and everyone involved.) They shout out Daigo, Fuudo, Bon-chan, etc. as winners here. They also talk about how it wasn't just Street Fighter, but other games as well (for EVO and Tougeki.)

They then turn to the Tougeki series of community run tournaments backed by Enterbrain (now Kadokawa) that had strong roots with the community, started in 2003. One of the reasons for that is because they used a series of qualifying tournaments at arcades around the country and needed community involvement for that to actually work.

After 1999 and delivering SF3: 3rd Strike Capcom was focusing less on arcade games and more on consumer games with Monster Hunter and Resident Evil. Until July 2008, when they released SF4 in Arcades. Lots of people were asking "Why come back to Street Fighter now?" and the answer was the community.

In the 9 years that no new numbered Street Fighter game was released, at Tougeki and other tournament fans kept playing the game and instead of the community decreasing, new people were even brought in and joining the community. There were many arcades that kept their Street Fighter machines even as all the other machines changed in and out at a fast pace. Usually with new fighting game machines in arcades the income would peak quickly, and then drop off. Street Fighter had a different income curve where there was a stable floor with people that loved and just kept playing it. (This arcade discussion is really neat, I'd love to hear Fubarduck's take. Or Henry Cen.)

Capcom was convinced that there are fans for this series, but was concerned that maybe people have grown tired of fighting games, or that there is only a hardcore fanbase that wouldn't make business sense to pursue - so going for SF4 had risks as well. But it turned out it was a successful arcade title, and the home conversions were successful as well, hitting 3.4 million units. (Dealing with all these by 10,000 units in my head is a real pain. Thanks no thanks 万 unit counter.)

2.2 Japanese dominate Capcom Cup 2013

They introduce the idea of a world level tournament in San Francisco with $500,000 in prizes and a sports car (Scion FR-S Street Fighter 25th anniversary edition) as a prize. From that they got the idea of a continuing Street Fighter tournament series and Capcom Cup was born. It started in December 2013 run by Capcom USA.

Capcom Cup 2013 had SF4 AE 2012, UMVC3, and SFxTekken (I have no memory of those other two titles.) They had different ways to get into the tournament depending on the game, and it was streamed on both Twitch and Nico Nico. They run down the winners (sako, Xian, Fuudo, Haitani, Tokido in that order), observing that Japan really showed its strength.

2.3 The Start of the Capcom Pro Tour

3 Setting up the Street Fighter League

4 Responding to the Corona virus and changing to a Team Owner system

5 Interview with the Street Fighter League Pro-JP 2021 Teams

6 Interview with Capcom President Harujiro Tsujimoto

October 23, 2021

Trip to Angel Forest Shiobara in Nasu

We decided a few months back to take another trip domestically in Japan, since we were not going to do any international travel this year. We rented a house for three days and two nights in the Nasu Angel Forest that is dog friendly. They have dog runs, allow dogs to stay with you, there is a hot springs, pool, and some other stuff. It's up in the mountains, about a three hour drive from Tokyo.

read more (2075 words)

October 18, 2021

2021-09 Japan FGC Roundup

This is a roundup of random stuff that I've been following over the past month or so. No real deep research or anything, but I like having a permanent record around, and a little more space to express my opinions that I get in twitter.

read more (1123 words)

September 26, 2021

Street Fighter League: Pro-JP 2021 Pre-Season

Table of Contents

Capcom ran a pre-seaon for the 2021 Street Fighter League: Pro-JP. It was streamed on a paid site, about $20 for a ticket for both days. I watched it, and took some notes.

read more (3213 words)

August 24, 2021

Street Fighter League: Pro-JP 2021

Street Fighter League is happening again this year. Street Fighter League: Pro-JP 2021 will start in October, with a pre-season that has games 2021-09-25 and 2021-09-26.

This year's league is structured differently from previous years: the teams are professional eSports teams or corporate sponsors. Since there are existing players on eSports teams, there was a very interesting process to choose members for all the teams. Similar to previouus years, there is a draft with multiple entry points.

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July 8, 2021

2021-06-21 Hoshino Risonare Yatsugatake

We've been in the pandemic, working from home, since February 2020. We went once to a cabin in 2020 September, out in Nasu, which was nice. We haven't had a chance to get vaccinated yet, and the Tokyo 2020 Olympics held in 2021 during a pandemic when Japan has about 12.5% of the population vaccinated, which isn't going to be good for anyone. We decided a few months back to take a vacation, and Lisa reserved 3 nights and 4 days at Hoshino Risonare Yatsugatake Resort in Yamanashi.

read more (3418 words)

January 13, 2021

Q1 Fighting game events in or around Tokyo

Previous: 2020 Q4 Tokyo FGC Events | Next

Seems like I've gotten into the habit of tracking FGC offline events in the Tokyo area. This isn't a comprehensive list, but feel free to contact me if you want me to add anything. You also should try TopTier.gg which tracks fighting game locals around the world.

Very generally:

The arcade scene is vibrant, and you are likely to find competition at any arcade, but some are more well known than others. You might want to check out

  • Mikado Arcade, Map Takadanobaba
  • Taito Station Shinjuku East Exit, Map
  • Various arcades in Akihabara, Club Sega, Hey!
  • Various shops in Akihabara like the retro game store Super Potato, Map
  • Play Spot Big One 2nd, Map. Out in Chiba, but good place for 3rd Strike or Melty Blood. (Thanks Arlieth!)
  • Game Newton, Map. Lots of ST setups.

If you are comfortable with Japanese, Kakuge-checker.com has a comprehensive list of offline, online, and other events going around all over Japan. I don't know how he/they/she does it.

Due to concerns around COVID-19, most large recurring events have been cancelled until further notice. Be careful out there.

Kakuge-checker.com has a list of online events, if you are interested in those.

read more (2899 words)

September 16, 2020

Weekend trip to Nasu

We usually go to America in the summer for a month or three, but this year due to Corona Virus we didn't go. So we spent a bit of time thinking about safe vacations, and settled on renting a cabin in Nasu, a vacation spot about a three hours drive from Tokyo. A friend of mine is originally from Nasu, and ever since I've met him he's been talking about how nice Nasu is. There are really a lot of "vacation homes" (or maybe timeshares - hard for me to tell) out here, and there are a surprising (for me!) number of large and nice looking restaurants off of the main road. Many places are dog friendly, and have large parking lots, both rarities for people from Tokyo. I could definitely see coming back here on a regular basis, though the drive is a bit far from the part of Tokyo that we are in. We (my family and Lisa's parents, along with their two year old miniature Schnauzer Sakura) piled into our mini-van and drove out there on Saturday. Before checking in to the cabin, we went to a Soba place, "Seiryu no Sato", which has a stocked fishing pond, allows for dogs, has lots of outdoor seating, and is generally quite nice. I had an excellent Curry Soba. It was raining a bit, so we skipped on the fishing - that was the main thing that Alan wanted to do on the trip - and instead went shopping for some vegetables and bread for the morning breakfast.

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August 10, 2020

eXeField Akiba opening event

eXeField Akiba is a new e-sports facility in Akihabara, located in the Akihabara UDX building. It is part of NTT eSports, and they had an opening ceremony 2020-08-10. The video is above. I'll add some simple running commentary with just a basic overview of what is going on.

read more (893 words)

August 2, 2020

2020 August JP FGC News Round-up

1 2020 August JP FGC News Round-up

I haven't really been doing much translation lately - I've been super busy with work and family - but I have followed a few interesting threads on twitter. I thought I would gather things up in this blog post to preserve them, since Twitter is generally a blink-and-you-miss-it experience, unless you are talking about digging up old tweets about someone saying the wrong or right word of the day.

read more (2162 words)

July 2, 2020

2020 July and on Fighting Game Events in Tokyo

Previous: 2020 March through June Tokyo FGC Events | 2020 Q4 Tokyo FGC Events

Seems like I've gotten into the habit of tracking FGC offline events in the Tokyo area. This isn't a comprehensive list, but feel free to contact me if you want me to add anything. You also should try TopTier.gg which tracks fighting game locals around the world.

Very generally:

  • eXeFIELD Akiba (Map) is a venue in the UDX Building in Akihabara. Wednesday nights are generally fighting game nights. Friday evenings you get a beer ticket with entry and can get beer with that.
  • On Tuesdays there is a DBFZ, Tekken7, and Soul Calibur event run by Jiyuna and MajinObama at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map. It is actually officially sponsored as well!
  • On Wednesdays SFV (Fighter's Crossover Akihabara – FCA is the event name) at Akihabara ESports Square (the place, Map) starting from 7pm. There are usually around 20 setups, all with sticks. The place has a bar with food too.
  • On Thursdays there is usually a SFV event at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map or sometimes BeasTV's Jikoken TV with Fuudo.
  • Also on some Thursdays there is a DBFZ event orgaqnized by Kagecchi at Akihabara eSports Square.
  • Studio Sky (Map) announced on 2018-09-14 that they will be an open esports space, and as part of that I'm not yet sure of their schedule, but I add information about their events when I see it.
  • Shot Bar Lucy has different events on different days, and usually on Friday night is an all-night event featuring various games (Map), Calendar.
  • The Plaza Capcom at Kichijoji (Map) has the Capcom eSPORTS Club which has free SFV setups, and often runs events.
  • Game Bar Cross-up in Umeda, Osaka (Map) usually does SFV on Tuesday, Guilty Gear and BlazBlue on Wednesday, and KOF14 on Thursday.
  • Game Bar Bridge, in Tachikawa, usually runs some fighting game stuff. Their schedule is pinned to the gbbtachikawa profile.
  • Check Gaijin Gaming Brothers for information about Smash related events in Japan. I add Tokyo based events to my list, but they track events all over Japan with English information.
  • Syogepi-events has a Google Calendar of his events. He often runs platinum and under begginer friendly events. They have an English based guide to participating in their events.

I don't really track free play events or tournaments at arcades - there are lots of them.

The arcade scene is vibrant, and you are likely to find competition at any arcade, but some are more well known than others. You might want to check out

  • Mikado Arcade, Map Takadanobaba
  • Taito Station Shinjuku East Exit, Map
  • Various arcades in Akihabara, Club Sega, Hey!
  • Various shops in Akihabara like the retro game store Super Potato, Map
  • Play Spot Big One 2nd, Map. Out in Chiba, but good place for 3rd Strike or Melty Blood. (Thanks Arlieth!)
  • Game Newton, Map. Lots of ST setups.
  • Your Warehouse, Map Kawasaki (For the crazy design) Oh no, this iconic arcade has shut down as of Nov. 7th.

If you are comfortable with Japanese, Kakuge-checker.com has a comprehensive list of offline, online, and other events going around all over Japan. I don't know how he/they/she does it.

Due to concerns around COVID-19, most large recurring events have been cancelled until further notice. Be careful out there.

Kakuge-checker.com has a list of online events, if you are interested in those.

read more (4309 words)

March 7, 2020

"Camping" at the deepest underground station in Japan: Doai

On the Shinkansen We were on the Tanigawa Max two story Shinkansen Sledding at Norn Ski resort Sledding at Norn Ski resort Octone Brewing Nice local beers! Nice view on the walk to the brewery

2020-02-29

We took the Tanigawa Max Shinkansen from Tokyo to Jyomokougen (上毛高原). The trip was about an hour from Tokyo station. Our seats were on the second floor of the Tanigawa Max Shinkansen. I don’t think they are making more of the two story trains, so getting to ride one is pretty nice. The station we stopped at is only for the Shinkansen, the area itself is called Minakami-Machi (みなかみ町) and there is a separate station (Minakami station) for the local trains.

Then we took a bus about 20 to the nearby Norn Ski Resort where we played at the Kid’s sledding slope for about two hours.

A bit before 1pm we headed inside for lunch.

Took the 3pm shuttle bus to Minakami Station.

Then a 15 minute walk to the Octone Brewery. The town was small and the Main Street bear the station was full of abandoned shops. It reminded me of small country towns in rural Washington state. Walking for a while we started to come across some run down hotels, and what was obviously 30 years ago a very nice hot springs resort but now only just holding on as the star of a dying town. The brewery was really live and we filled up our growler after trying 2 tasting flights. We filled it up (1.9 liters of beer) and went back to the station. There was a 3:40pm train or a 4:40pm train. That was it.

We made it to the station with about 5 minutes to spare. We were headed to Doai station, two stops away.

read more (1917 words)

January 3, 2020

2020 January and February Fighting Game Events in Tokyo

Previous: 2019 September, November, and December Fighting Game Events in Tokyo | Next

Seems like I've gotten into the habit of tracking FGC offline events in the Tokyo area. This isn't a comprehensive list, but feel free to contact me if you want me to add anything. You also should try TopTier.gg which tracks fighting game locals around the world.

Very generally:

  • On Tuesdays there is a DBFZ, Tekken7, and Soul Calibur event run by Jiyuna and MajinObama at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map. It is actually officially sponsored as well!
  • On Wednesdays SFV (Fighter's Crossover Akihabara – FCA is the event name) at Akihabara ESports Square (the place, Map) starting from 7pm. There are usually around 20 setups, all with sticks. The place has a bar with food too.
  • On Thursdays there is usually a SFV event at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map or sometimes BeasTV's Jikoken TV with Fuudo.
  • Also on some Thursdays there is a DBFZ event orgaqnized by Kagecchi at Akihabara eSports Square.
  • Studio Sky (Map) announced on 2018-09-14 that they will be an open esports space, and as part of that I'm not yet sure of their schedule, but I add information about their events when I see it.
  • Shot Bar Lucy has different events on different days, and usually on Friday night is an all-night event featuring various games (Map), Calendar.
  • The Plaza Capcom at Kichijoji (Map) has the Capcom eSPORTS Club which has free SFV setups, and often runs events.
  • Game Bar Cross-up in Umeda, Osaka (Map) usually does SFV on Tuesday, Guilty Gear and BlazBlue on Wednesday, and KOF14 on Thursday.
  • Game Bar Bridge, in Tachikawa, usually runs some fighting game stuff. Their schedule is pinned to the gbbtachikawa profile.
  • Check Gaijin Gaming Brothers for information about Smash related events in Japan. I add Tokyo based events to my list, but they track events all over Japan with English information.
  • Syogepi-events has a Google Calendar of his events. He often runs platinum and under begginer friendly events. They have an English based guide to participating in their events.

I don't really track free play events or tournaments at arcades - there are lots of them.

The arcade scene is vibrant, and you are likely to find competition at any arcade, but some are more well known than others. You might want to check out

  • Mikado Arcade, Map Takadanobaba
  • Taito Station Shinjuku East Exit, Map
  • Various arcades in Akihabara, Club Sega, Hey!
  • Various shops in Akihabara like the retro game store Super Potato, Map
  • Play Spot Big One 2nd, Map. Out in Chiba, but good place for 3rd Strike or Melty Blood. (Thanks Arlieth!)
  • Game Newton, Map. Lots of ST setups.
  • Your Warehouse, Map Kawasaki (For the crazy design) Oh no, this iconic arcade has shut down as of Nov. 7th.

If you are comfortable with Japanese, Kakuge-checker.com has a comprehensive list of offline, online, and other events going around all over Japan. I don't know how he/they/she does it.

read more (4591 words)

October 22, 2019

September 16, 2019

JeSU Presentation at TGS 2019 Summary

I'm summarizing this Game Watch article because it was the first that I came across that explained things clearly, but JeSU has their own press release with links to the No Action Letter they sent to Ministry of Consumer Affairs and the response they got.

read more (1515 words)

September 15, 2019

2019 September, November, and December Fighting Game Events in Tokyo

Previous: 2019 July and August Fighting Game Events in Tokyo | 2020 January and February Fighting Game Events in Tokyo

Seems like I've gotten into the habit of tracking FGC offline events in the Tokyo area. This isn't a comprehensive list, but feel free to contact me if you want me to add anything. You also should try TopTier.gg which tracks fighting game locals around the world.

Very generally:

  • On Tuesdays there is a DBFZ, Tekken7, and Soul Calibur event run by Jiyuna and MajinObama at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map. It is actually officially sponsored as well!
  • On Wednesdays SFV (Fighter's Crossover Akihabara – FCA is the event name) at Akihabara ESports Square (the place, Map) starting from 7pm. There are usually around 20 setups, all with sticks. The place has a bar with food too.
  • On Thursdays there is usually a SFV event at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map or sometimes BeasTV's Jikoken TV with Fuudo.
  • Also on some Thursdays there is a DBFZ event orgaqnized by Kagecchi at Akihabara eSports Square.
  • Studio Sky (Map) announced on 2018-09-14 that they will be an open esports space, and as part of that I'm not yet sure of their schedule, but I add information about their events when I see it.
  • Shot Bar Lucy has different events on different days, and usually on Friday night is an all-night event featuring various games (Map), Calendar.
  • The Plaza Capcom at Kichijoji (Map) has the Capcom eSPORTS Club which has free SFV setups, and often runs events.
  • Game Bar Cross-up in Umeda, Osaka (Map) usually does SFV on Tuesday, Guilty Gear and BlazBlue on Wednesday, and KOF14 on Thursday.
  • Game Bar Bridge, in Tachikawa, usually runs some fighting game stuff. Their schedule is pinned to the gbbtachikawa profile.
  • Check Gaijin Gaming Brothers for information about Smash related events in Japan. I add Tokyo based events to my list, but they track events all over Japan with English information.
  • Syogepi-events has a Google Calendar of his events. He often runs platinum and under begginer friendly events. They have an English based guide to participating in their events.

I don't really track free play events or tournaments at arcades - there are lots of them.

The arcade scene is vibrant, and you are likely to find competition at any arcade, but some are more well known than others. You might want to check out

  • Mikado Arcade, Map Takadanobaba
  • Taito Station Shinjuku East Exit, Map
  • Various arcades in Akihabara, Club Sega, Hey!
  • Various shops in Akihabara like the retro game store Super Potato, Map
  • Play Spot Big One 2nd, Map. Out in Chiba, but good place for 3rd Strike or Melty Blood. (Thanks Arlieth!)
  • Game Newton, Map. Lots of ST setups.
  • Your Warehouse, Map Kawasaki (For the crazy design) Oh no, this iconic arcade has shut down as of Nov. 7th.

If you are comfortable with Japanese, Kakuge-checker.com has a comprehensive list of offline, online, and other events going around all over Japan. I don't know how he/they/she does it.

read more (9697 words)

July 3, 2019

2019 July and August Fighting Game Events in Tokyo

Previous: 2019 July and August Fighting Game Events in Tokyo | Next

Seems like I've gotten into the habit of tracking FGC offline events in the Tokyo area. This isn't a comprehensive list, but feel free to contact me if you want me to add anything. You also should try TopTier.gg which tracks fighting game locals around the world.

Very generally:

  • On Tuesdays there is a DBFZ, Tekken7, and Soul Calibur event run by Jiyuna and MajinObama at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map. It is actually officially sponsored as well!
  • On Wednesdays SFV (Fighter's Crossover Akihabara – FCA is the event name) at Akihabara ESports Square (the place, Map) starting from 7pm. There are usually around 20 setups, all with sticks. The place has a bar with food too.
  • On Thursdays there is usually a SFV event at Red Bull Gaming Sphere, Map or sometimes BeasTV's Jikoken TV with Fuudo.
  • Also on some Thursdays there is a DBFZ event orgaqnized by Kagecchi at Akihabara eSports Square.
  • Studio Sky (Map) announced on 2018-09-14 that they will be an open esports space, and as part of that I'm not yet sure of their schedule, but I add information about their events when I see it.
  • Shot Bar Lucy has different events on different days, and usually on Friday night is an all-night event featuring various games (Map), Calendar.
  • The Plaza Capcom at Kichijoji (Map) has the Capcom eSPORTS Club which has free SFV setups, and often runs events.
  • Game Bar Cross-up in Umeda, Osaka (Map) usually does SFV on Tuesday, Guilty Gear and BlazBlue on Wednesday, and KOF14 on Thursday.
  • Game Bar Bridge, in Tachikawa, usually runs some fighting game stuff. Their schedule is pinned to the gbbtachikawa profile.
  • Check Gaijin Gaming Brothers for information about Smash related events in Japan. I add Tokyo based events to my list, but they track events all over Japan with English information.
  • Syogepi-events has a Google Calendar of his events. He often runs platinum and under begginer friendly events. They have an English based guide to participating in their events.

I don't really track free play events or tournaments at arcades - there are lots of them. maplejpca tells me that there is a free play UNIST every Friday night from 8pm to 10pm at Sega Nishi Shinjuku. The arcade scene is vibrant, and you are likely to find competition at any arcade, but some are more well known than others. You might want to check out

  • Mikado Arcade, Map Takadanobaba
  • Taito Station Shinjuku East Exit, Map
  • Various arcades in Akihabara, Club Sega, Hey!
  • Various shops in Akihabara like the retro game store Super Potato, Map
  • Play Spot Big One 2nd, Map. Out in Chiba, but good place for 3rd Strike or Melty Blood. (Thanks Arlieth!)
  • Game Newton, Map. Lots of ST setups.
  • Your Warehouse, Map Kawasaki (For the crazy design)

If you are comfortable with Japanese, Kakuge-checker.com has a comprehensive list of offline, online, and other events going around all over Japan. I don't know how he/they/she does it.

read more (4187 words)

June 28, 2019

The 200th Fighter's Crossover -Akiba- SFV local

The weekly SFV local at Akihabara eSports Square, called Fighter's Crossover Akihabara, had its 200th anniversary last week. There was a special event for it, with pizza, games, and giveaways. I wrote a bit about it.

read more (1301 words)

June 24, 2019

A variety of interesting FGC events in June in Japan 2019

Over the weekend there were many interesting FGC things going on. As a Street Fighter fan, that is what I'm primarily interested in.

I'm not even talking about Thaiger Uppercut, or The Fight.

Two tournaments took place that will send the winner to EVO in Las Vegas, Grapht's GGGCup and the Fukushima Gaming Day SFV tournament. One of those was held at a traditional Japanese Hot Springs resort. The College representative team for the JP Street Fighter League was decided, and a few more Arcade qualifiers happened. WE-R1 held a tournament at Round1 on Arcade Hardware, and we got to see some high level Alex play, and SNK had another one of their Samurai Shodown streams, this time with a tournament featuring some well-know pro players.

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May 10, 2019

JP 2019 Fall Street Fighter League: Pro-JP

Fall 2019 SFL College Arcade banner

On Thursday, 2019-05-09 (as far as I can tell) Capcom released details about the upcoming Fall 2019 JP Street Fighter League.

This is all a bit confusing, but I believe the proper name for this is now "Street Fighter League: Pro-JP", as it says on the main streetfighterleague.capcom-s.com site.

It has some changes from the Japan Capcom Street Fighter League Powered by RAGE that ran from January 26th to March 21st in 2019 (or from December 4th, 2018, if you include the Beginner Class Auditions). If you hadn't heard of these events, I wrote extensively about them on my personal blog, which as a personal blog for a random dude just writing about hobby stuff, rightly should not be read by many people. It was a really interesting and fun series that followed on in the footsteps of the 2018 RAGE All Star League Powered by Capcom (note the intentionally different naming) and was a pre-cursor to the currently running Capcom Street Fighter League currently running in America. I couldn't find an official link for that, which shocks me, but read this cool article about Toi by Ginni Lou.

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